DESIGN INTERVENTION – Peeli Dori

DESIGN INTERVENTION

What is the real meaning of the term, ‘Design Intervention’ ?

As discussed with the lead design team of Peeli Dori, Design Intervention is something which we call as modifying things to allocate them for a better and modern purpose. Rather than innovating completely, you modify and enhance the functional and aesthetic characteristics of a product. It is design intervention.

Peeli Dori offers bespoke design services. They deal with handcrafting techniques of India and therefore use design intervention as the major technique to make crafts or handcrafting techniques more purposeful in the urban scenario.

A creative design is one with functional aesthetics. We consider a collection of Peeli Dori to understand the design process followed by them.

 

Vann Collection – Deck Pillows and Cushion Covers

Product Realization

The first step which takes place is the analysis of product requirement in the niche market. With time people preferences and habits change. The mode they are following at a certain point of time determines the product that they would readily want to go for. A consumer analysis is done to figure out an oppurtunity area/sector. This determines and indicates major insights for the process ahead. It also gives a fair idea of the product category. This is the stage where maximum research takes place.

 

Trend Study

After it becomes clear which product category we are dealing with, trend study takes place. The forecast is referred to. In case of the VANN collection, forests and their shades were taken from the trends of 2017 as inspiration. Trends give a lot of detailed information about what people will like in a certain time from now.

picture1

 

Theme

The collection now comes down to the conceptualization stage. Every insight till now is put together to form a story and which is then taken as a theme for the final design.

Here the forests were taken as the theme. The colours and the patterns, extracted from forests were put together to create a theme board/inspiration board.

theme

 

Mood-board

Mood-board is the stage where the look of the product is determined. How the product shall feel like as an end result and what kind of vibes it will give is stated in visual format. The Mood-board of VANN collection states features like minimalism, green shades, geometric and tactile. It gives insights to decide on the design conceptualization.

mood

 

Design Conceptualization

After the above stages, starts the real design. It is where the real conceptualization happens to form the real design. From the choice of materials to the form and structure, everything is decided and given a real body. How the technique will follow the modern design is the major manifesto of Peeli Dori design team at this stage.

Peeli Dori designs to intervene the roots of the technique used to completely change the look of it as a final outcome.

In VANN collection hand knitting is used to give a tactile service and its a complete new look in terms of knitted products.

The collection will be available on their website soon!

Hot Cocoa on Knits.

“Hot cocoa and fuzzy socks, it’s winters already.”

Winters are here with a whimsical warmth to make you want a cozy and comfy place to dig in yourself. When I say dig in, you literally want to do so, in heavy knits and a hot cup of coffee. A soft seating with a couple of throws can make it sound more tempting and workable.

 

Knitted Decor

We all follow that heavy lifestyle of shifting from our comfy beds to office chairs and then to magnificent armchairs. It is winters and we look for “cozy comfort” everywhere we sit. Why not have the warmth in our seating. The knitted ottomans and poufs work the best in this scenario.

 

Why Knits?

Knits are a traditional technique of crafting woolens for winters. They keep you warm and cozy. This technique is now taken to do interiors and the world is loving it!

We find a lot of luxury goods in soft home furnishing to be hand-knitted. This term has a lot of worth in it so it is quite soft to imagine the warmth behind the whole product itself. The biggest trend setters are the hand-knitted poufs to dig in yourself completely.

A window spreading rays of morning sunlight with a warm hot chocolate and a comfy hand-knitted pouf, this is what Peeli Dori describes as Peeli Dori winters. The exclusive collection launched for this style and feel are already out for sale. Each following the colour trend of ‘Midnight Garden’ and how the beautiful flowers emerge out as stunning beauties.  The poufs are similar in their language. The colours will settle the winter blues and make the activities more energetic.

The poufs are like a cup of coffee and will provide the same comfort differently.

 

Behind the Scenes

The collection is handcrafted by the ladies of Sanghoi Village,Karnal, India. They are skilled with the technique and with a two week training program they were all set to provide the finest of details to Peeli Dori products. The sole owner of these poufs, they are hoping for the best results.

Let’s give them an answer to their hope. Check out the link below and tell us what you feel about the collection.

Link- http://bit.ly/2hItcdh

 

Chiseling Their Livelihood- Wood Carving | Raw Revivals

Residing in all parts of the nation, wood carving is a craft which is like a plant with flowers of various kinds. Each state has its own version of it and yet maintains its individual identity. This  intricate art is acquired in the skills of people practising it with one common aspect which is determination and hard work.

The art of making patterns and motifs is since the Mughal period. Intricate chests and furniture wooden pieces were made for the royals. Since then, it serves luxury both in India and overseas. This renowned technique has made its own niche in the industry and is conclusive of major part of the furniture industry. While sheesham is the most widely used type of wood, mango, teak, rosewood, ebony, sandalwood, walnut and deodar are also used. Intricately carved wooden pillars and doorways can be found in temples and palaces across the country. With royal patronage being replaced by market dynamics, wood carving is now mostly found in functional articles like furniture, bowls, boxes, lamp stands, etc.

Completely hand done, this technique requires a lot of patience to chisel out the motif from the wooden block and make the aesthetics coincide with luxury. Designs are first made on paper, and transferred onto the wood using ink. These are then carved using a variety of chisels. The article is finished by buffing in order to bring out the shine of the wood. This is usually done with the help of a lathe mechanism.

Its roots reaching out to various parts of the country which include:

Rajasthan: Bassi – carved figures, wooden shrines; Pipar, Bhari Sajanpur – bowls

Jammu & Kashmir: carved walnut wood utility and decorative items – bowls, trays, jewellery boxes, screens, tables, cupboards

Uttar Pradesh: Sahranpur – screens, folding tables, trays, bowls, boxes; Pilkhuwa, Farukkabad – printing blocks

Intricate jaalis and motifs, derived from the influences of the ancient architecture, is one major context of export from the country. Many international brands have their wood carving units in India. It is one craft which is contributing to the Indian economy and creating an impact.

Peeli Dori attempts to give this flourishing craft a contemporary face to get it in tune with today’s lifestyle.

 

Credits: Niharika Choudhary

Consumer Who Defines Sustainability.

‘Aaaj kisiki pant nai jaegi neeche!’, exclaimed one of the vendors across the road. My ears halted and my eyes instantly moved to support, what he was referring to. The ’not so old’ dark looking lean guy, was busy selling belts by shouting on the top of his voice. A good number of people surrounded him. One of his colleagues was opening and showcasing designs to his customers. As I went near, renowned brands were visible to me, available on his setup for the product variants of leather belts.

Imagine! A guy selling extremely fine knock-offs of belts in just 150 rupees for a pair. Who can dare to beat this increasing hype of fake products reaching people? Industrialized mass-produced copies of original products are misleading a large segment of market and some ‘not-so- sensitive’ customers. The demand and supply chain is dominated by this sector so much that no other lead can make its space through. People are losing the value of their products and in turn nothing connects them to it in order to retain it for a longer time.

The context here is to talk about how sustainability is directly related to the value added to a product. The value can be both monetary and intangible. When something as simple as a belt is bought with some sort of value, in terms of a brand value or maybe as an exclusive piece, one tends to retain it for a very long time. Sustainability in terms of the durability increases when things are bought with some sort of emotional connect to it. Does not really matter how often you use the product but it is always there with you. The products serve you for a longer time. When things which are just bought without any consideration, one like the knock-off belts, one does not really care for how long the product is a part of his life. It is mere a product to facilitate an action or serve a purpose. Directly affecting the consumption rate, the industrialized products are those viruses, which tempt you to first reach the core and the eats you from within. Besides high consumption rate these also affect the traditional ways of crafting valuable products.

The only difference visible in the rate of consumption in rural and urban areas has this reason following. The affluent lifestyles in urban areas make the low valued products loose connect with the mind of its customer.

Artisans are running out of business. What other choice do they have! Either they have to sell their two days of hard work in less than 150 rupees or remain workless. Many are skipping the art of handcrafting and joining the industries because of this reason.

As a customer myself, I consider it my responsibility to be sensitised enough toward my buying activities, which are affecting my environment. Being an urban consumer, one’s poverty is increasing to become affluent in monetary lifestyle but very poor in values towards their own environment. They know how to define sustainability but lack enough courage and consciousness to apply the same.

Jodhpuri Jooti- The leather craft

It was when we reached the Jodhpur Railway station, in the morning, everyone was ready for the experience ahead. Even after the long overnight train journey, there was no glimpse of fatigue on our faces. Breakfast in Jodhpur was on our minda a soo as we got down on the land on Rajasthan, yet again.

The city is known as the ,’sun city’ for the bright and sunny weather it enjoys round the year. It is also referred to as the ,’blue city’, due to blue houses around the Maharanghar fort (The fort in Jodhpur). It is set in the stark landscape of the Thar desert, previously known as Marwar.

Jodhpur being a colour rich city, has craft culture as one of key source of Income other than tourism. Blue painted houses give a very fascinated feeling along with historical monuments and motifs, seeking attention. The handicraft industry has in recent years eclipsed all the other industries in the city. Other items manufactured includes textiles, metal utensils, bone inlay and leather bags and mojries.

Peeli Dori Here attempts to naraate its experience and the tale of Jodhpuri leather craft. Approximately 1300 families are directly or indirectly dependent on leather craft for their livelihood. More than 5 lakh pairs of Jodhpuri jooties are manufactured every year. The bigger enterprises dealing with this craft are engaged in export of the same and hardly any fine product reaches the urban market of India. Maximum it reaches is the local market which is supplied by independent artisans with limited resources. They lack enough exposure to realise the value of their product and hence the exporting giants are minting money with their hard work. What they receive in turn is merely enough for them to sustain their living.

It is said that camel leather is used for bags and mojries here, but our research opened up that due to quality reasons, artisans have switched to cow and goat leather. They have the perfect tanned looking products. Natural oils are used for the unprocessed animal leather and are used in their raw form. Various techniques like, kashida embriodery, stamping, embossing are used to create intricate patterns and designs on leather. The process is completely done and by hands which give i an edge to the other leather products in the market. It’s a complete natural sustainable process using ethically sourced leather.

THE CRAFTSMAN

Suraj ji and his family has been into this craft for years now. He considers himself to have a god gift of craft and miniature products. Working since he was 12 in age, his enthusiasm of exploring in his own field of handcrafting has not been affected by the growing age and increasing responsibility of his family. As all the other craftsman, he also wants his next generation to pursue corporate jobs as carrier and not the craft. He does not wish to have the same lifestyle for then since he realise that this work does not fetch him enough as compared to the hard work and the amount of time he puts into his profession. The industrialization is taking their business away which once used to the priority for the royals.

THE PROCESS

The process of developing a product in this craft cluster starts with sourcing of leather from local vendors in Jodhpur to cleaning to leather with a tool called Rapi, which smoothes the surface and removes skin hair and uneven texture. Before this the leather is left to be soaked in water for a night to lower the salt content of leather which accumulates on its surface during the processing stage.

when the leather is ready all dried in sunlight, it becomes ad crisp and shinny. The patter required is cut out of it. Intricate kashida embroidery with silk thread is done the leather by females of the house. Other processes to give design detail to the product includes, hand embossing, hand stamping using metal dyes.

Stitched together now the product is ready to be used. To give darker shade to the product oil is used as a enhancer and for natural aroma.

Peeli Dori attempts to make these small independent artisans to stand for their work and compete with industries along with earning revenue that they deserve.

Adda | Raw Revivals

Aroma of Indian culture is fantasizing the world globally. It has a charm which nothing can efface. From wood carving to fine brass inlay and ranging up to intricate weaving handlooms, India is opulent in hand skills. Celebrated hand woven fabrics and weaving techniques from India are peculiar to every culture and state. It varies with diversity of cultural norms according to the different states.  Hand woven brocade to rugs, this technique was practised for the royals since the ancient times. Being an activity of tradition, the skills are passed on from one generation to another. The process continues leading the craft techniques to reach the contemporary scenario.

Industrialization has dominated these techniques to an extent where they are not visible and known to the masses in its most authentic form. Running after sustainable practises and means to save the ecosystem, the generation has left behind the knowledge and values of these practises. One such craft practise, apt to the concept of sustainability in terms of product design and construction, comes our way, while exploring through some of the hidden skills in India.

In the of the state Haryana, a village Sanghoi, establishes itself with an art of rug weaving as their local skill. Located near Karnal, this village has its women practising the craft since generations and use these finely woven rugs to decorate their houses, as wall hangings and seat covers.

The rugs are woven on a handloom called ‘Adda’ in their local language. The yarn that they use to weave is made up of recycled fabric. Picking up different colours and assorting them to create a colourful design and pattern while weaving rugs, is their art and fine skill. Fabric re-use is taken too another level with this craft and is up cycled to create an amazing piece to add to the Décor of any place. Going well with the looks of rustic style interiors and eclectic style interiors, the rug has warmth in its designs and each yarn is precisely woven to create neat patterns adding to the look of the environment. The local patterns being used for the rugs are colourful stripes, since they are less time consuming to weave and require no technical details.

Each rug takes 2 to 3 days for one woman to weave. It is an extensive process requiring immense patience and hard work. The loom is a humble structure made of an iron frame and cotton warp with the yarn being weaved into it as weft. The yarn is made using strips of old fabric.

This practise is sustainable in every aspect without compromising on aesthetics. Durability of the rug is high and therefore makes it a very efficient technique. Unknown to the masses, this craft has a great relevance in the urban society.

Peeli Dori featured this craft to revive it and make the society more sensitive about these products. The revival can save it from extinction and make a community proud of the skills that they have.

 

 

 

The Bamboo and its knife – Raw Revivals

With all due respect to the beauty of art and aesthetics, a craftsman, when portrays his skills, all garnished up with colour, he tries to convey a message.

A message that speaks of his community, his passed on skills and a story engraved in the lines of his hands. His calibre is portrayed in the finesse of his product.

He is a craftsman, a human of potential.

 

Yet, another corner of the same city, New Delhi, Peeli Dori curated an artisan handcrafting bamboo lifestyle products. He is one that can give life to a bamboo stick with just his skills and knowledge.

On a sunny day with hopes of collaboration and studying one efficient skill practice in India, the bamboo craft, Peeli Dori decided to spread out its reach. It’s astonishing as well as exciting that so many stories are available in just one city. Imagine about the entire country!

The man sat with his co-artisans, busy filing a bamboo stick with his sharp knife. As we approached him, intense in his looks and very generous in his gestures, he welcomed us by offering his bamboo stools to sit. We made ourselves comfortable with him, taking help of some start-up conversations about him and his work. We asked him a couple of questions like, since when and how many in number, he crafted products using bamboo. He was dark and polite in appearance. All his answers came to us with a pleasant smile. He was Suresh, a bamboo craftsman.

ABOUT HIS WORK

Suresh had a hold on his knife, a precise one. His capability and practice to transform a piece of bamboo into a fine usable product was commendable. Product categories that he addressed to with his knowledge were, kid’s furniture, tables, chairs, side stools, laundry bags, general storage, trinket boxes etc. There was a wide range of products, but the only missing aspect was management of his time and the revenue. Suresh spent half of his day crafting a product that he sold in just 50 INR. He had beautiful products but it was difficult to spot him, since his shop was in the corner of a lane.

He used bamboo sticks and finely woven fibres of bamboo with colour accents of different threads. His knife did it all for him, rest was up to tying, nailing and pasting. From scratch to the finishing, he knew what all will go in to complete a product. His material, bamboo is the most sustainable need of the hour. It’s a quick growing resource and does not utilise a lot of water. Bamboo at the same time is easy on the pockets and one can craft various products out of it. We need people like Suresh to take bamboo craft to a next level and make it available for the masses.

SOME MASTERPIECES

Suresh had a little space to him and it was where he displayed his work for sale as well as managed to have his workshop. Some of his well-crafted products that fascinated us were the kid’s table, the stool we were offered to sit on and some storage bowls. Many more can take their place in the list. He had a fine way of combining colour with neutral bamboo shades.

 

INABILITY TO UNDERSTAND THE POTENTIAL MARKET

Suresh had all the talent one requires to achieve excellence in his work, but still he cannot manage a well sustainable lifestyle for himself, he cannot grow his business. The only reason we could see is that he cannot reached the market, a potential one I would say. He had no idea to what extent people needed his skills out there in the urban world, to sustain their lifestyle and have a healthy environment.

 

CRAFT/TECHNIQUES- Bamboo craft

LOCATION- New Delhi

MATERIAL- Bamboo

PROBLEM- unidentified market and inability to reach them

POTENTIAL/ADVANTAGE- Sustainable product, need of the hour.