Hot Cocoa on Knits.

“Hot cocoa and fuzzy socks, it’s winters already.”

Winters are here with a whimsical warmth to make you want a cozy and comfy place to dig in yourself. When I say dig in, you literally want to do so, in heavy knits and a hot cup of coffee. A soft seating with a couple of throws can make it sound more tempting and workable.

 

Knitted Decor

We all follow that heavy lifestyle of shifting from our comfy beds to office chairs and then to magnificent armchairs. It is winters and we look for “cozy comfort” everywhere we sit. Why not have the warmth in our seating. The knitted ottomans and poufs work the best in this scenario.

 

Why Knits?

Knits are a traditional technique of crafting woolens for winters. They keep you warm and cozy. This technique is now taken to do interiors and the world is loving it!

We find a lot of luxury goods in soft home furnishing to be hand-knitted. This term has a lot of worth in it so it is quite soft to imagine the warmth behind the whole product itself. The biggest trend setters are the hand-knitted poufs to dig in yourself completely.

A window spreading rays of morning sunlight with a warm hot chocolate and a comfy hand-knitted pouf, this is what Peeli Dori describes as Peeli Dori winters. The exclusive collection launched for this style and feel are already out for sale. Each following the colour trend of ‘Midnight Garden’ and how the beautiful flowers emerge out as stunning beauties.  The poufs are similar in their language. The colours will settle the winter blues and make the activities more energetic.

The poufs are like a cup of coffee and will provide the same comfort differently.

 

Behind the Scenes

The collection is handcrafted by the ladies of Sanghoi Village,Karnal, India. They are skilled with the technique and with a two week training program they were all set to provide the finest of details to Peeli Dori products. The sole owner of these poufs, they are hoping for the best results.

Let’s give them an answer to their hope. Check out the link below and tell us what you feel about the collection.

Link- http://bit.ly/2hItcdh

 

Chiseling Their Livelihood- Wood Carving | Raw Revivals

Residing in all parts of the nation, wood carving is a craft which is like a plant with flowers of various kinds. Each state has its own version of it and yet maintains its individual identity. This  intricate art is acquired in the skills of people practising it with one common aspect which is determination and hard work.

The art of making patterns and motifs is since the Mughal period. Intricate chests and furniture wooden pieces were made for the royals. Since then, it serves luxury both in India and overseas. This renowned technique has made its own niche in the industry and is conclusive of major part of the furniture industry. While sheesham is the most widely used type of wood, mango, teak, rosewood, ebony, sandalwood, walnut and deodar are also used. Intricately carved wooden pillars and doorways can be found in temples and palaces across the country. With royal patronage being replaced by market dynamics, wood carving is now mostly found in functional articles like furniture, bowls, boxes, lamp stands, etc.

Completely hand done, this technique requires a lot of patience to chisel out the motif from the wooden block and make the aesthetics coincide with luxury. Designs are first made on paper, and transferred onto the wood using ink. These are then carved using a variety of chisels. The article is finished by buffing in order to bring out the shine of the wood. This is usually done with the help of a lathe mechanism.

Its roots reaching out to various parts of the country which include:

Rajasthan: Bassi – carved figures, wooden shrines; Pipar, Bhari Sajanpur – bowls

Jammu & Kashmir: carved walnut wood utility and decorative items – bowls, trays, jewellery boxes, screens, tables, cupboards

Uttar Pradesh: Sahranpur – screens, folding tables, trays, bowls, boxes; Pilkhuwa, Farukkabad – printing blocks

Intricate jaalis and motifs, derived from the influences of the ancient architecture, is one major context of export from the country. Many international brands have their wood carving units in India. It is one craft which is contributing to the Indian economy and creating an impact.

Peeli Dori attempts to give this flourishing craft a contemporary face to get it in tune with today’s lifestyle.

 

Credits: Niharika Choudhary

Consumer Who Defines Sustainability.

‘Aaaj kisiki pant nai jaegi neeche!’, exclaimed one of the vendors across the road. My ears halted and my eyes instantly moved to support, what he was referring to. The ’not so old’ dark looking lean guy, was busy selling belts by shouting on the top of his voice. A good number of people surrounded him. One of his colleagues was opening and showcasing designs to his customers. As I went near, renowned brands were visible to me, available on his setup for the product variants of leather belts.

Imagine! A guy selling extremely fine knock-offs of belts in just 150 rupees for a pair. Who can dare to beat this increasing hype of fake products reaching people? Industrialized mass-produced copies of original products are misleading a large segment of market and some ‘not-so- sensitive’ customers. The demand and supply chain is dominated by this sector so much that no other lead can make its space through. People are losing the value of their products and in turn nothing connects them to it in order to retain it for a longer time.

The context here is to talk about how sustainability is directly related to the value added to a product. The value can be both monetary and intangible. When something as simple as a belt is bought with some sort of value, in terms of a brand value or maybe as an exclusive piece, one tends to retain it for a very long time. Sustainability in terms of the durability increases when things are bought with some sort of emotional connect to it. Does not really matter how often you use the product but it is always there with you. The products serve you for a longer time. When things which are just bought without any consideration, one like the knock-off belts, one does not really care for how long the product is a part of his life. It is mere a product to facilitate an action or serve a purpose. Directly affecting the consumption rate, the industrialized products are those viruses, which tempt you to first reach the core and the eats you from within. Besides high consumption rate these also affect the traditional ways of crafting valuable products.

The only difference visible in the rate of consumption in rural and urban areas has this reason following. The affluent lifestyles in urban areas make the low valued products loose connect with the mind of its customer.

Artisans are running out of business. What other choice do they have! Either they have to sell their two days of hard work in less than 150 rupees or remain workless. Many are skipping the art of handcrafting and joining the industries because of this reason.

As a customer myself, I consider it my responsibility to be sensitised enough toward my buying activities, which are affecting my environment. Being an urban consumer, one’s poverty is increasing to become affluent in monetary lifestyle but very poor in values towards their own environment. They know how to define sustainability but lack enough courage and consciousness to apply the same.