Adda | Raw Revivals

Aroma of Indian culture is fantasizing the world globally. It has a charm which nothing can efface. From wood carving to fine brass inlay and ranging up to intricate weaving handlooms, India is opulent in hand skills. Celebrated hand woven fabrics and weaving techniques from India are peculiar to every culture and state. It varies with diversity of cultural norms according to the different states.  Hand woven brocade to rugs, this technique was practised for the royals since the ancient times. Being an activity of tradition, the skills are passed on from one generation to another. The process continues leading the craft techniques to reach the contemporary scenario.

Industrialization has dominated these techniques to an extent where they are not visible and known to the masses in its most authentic form. Running after sustainable practises and means to save the ecosystem, the generation has left behind the knowledge and values of these practises. One such craft practise, apt to the concept of sustainability in terms of product design and construction, comes our way, while exploring through some of the hidden skills in India.

In the of the state Haryana, a village Sanghoi, establishes itself with an art of rug weaving as their local skill. Located near Karnal, this village has its women practising the craft since generations and use these finely woven rugs to decorate their houses, as wall hangings and seat covers.

The rugs are woven on a handloom called ‘Adda’ in their local language. The yarn that they use to weave is made up of recycled fabric. Picking up different colours and assorting them to create a colourful design and pattern while weaving rugs, is their art and fine skill. Fabric re-use is taken too another level with this craft and is up cycled to create an amazing piece to add to the Décor of any place. Going well with the looks of rustic style interiors and eclectic style interiors, the rug has warmth in its designs and each yarn is precisely woven to create neat patterns adding to the look of the environment. The local patterns being used for the rugs are colourful stripes, since they are less time consuming to weave and require no technical details.

Each rug takes 2 to 3 days for one woman to weave. It is an extensive process requiring immense patience and hard work. The loom is a humble structure made of an iron frame and cotton warp with the yarn being weaved into it as weft. The yarn is made using strips of old fabric.

This practise is sustainable in every aspect without compromising on aesthetics. Durability of the rug is high and therefore makes it a very efficient technique. Unknown to the masses, this craft has a great relevance in the urban society.

Peeli Dori featured this craft to revive it and make the society more sensitive about these products. The revival can save it from extinction and make a community proud of the skills that they have.

 

 

 

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